Semin Liver Dis 2019; 39(04): 476-482
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1693114
Review Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Hyperferritinemia in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Iron Accumulation or Inflammation?

Wenke Moris*
1  Department of Internal Medicine Gastroenterology and Clinical Geriatrics, Zuyderland Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands
2  Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3  School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM) University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
,
Pauline Verhaegh*
2  Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3  School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM) University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
,
Daisy Jonkers
2  Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3  School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM) University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
,
Cees van Deursen
1  Department of Internal Medicine Gastroenterology and Clinical Geriatrics, Zuyderland Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands
2  Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
,
Ger Koek
2  Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3  School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM) University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
4  Department of visceral and transplantation Surgery, Klinikum, RWTH, Aachen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Publication Date:
22 July 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Hyperferritinemia, observed in inflammation, iron overload as well as in combination of both, is found in ∼30% of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. The authors summarized the evidence regarding the potential cause of hyperferritinemia in NAFLD, as this may affect the indicated therapy. A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane library. In the majority of NAFLD patients, hyperferritinemia is due to inflammation without hepatic iron overload. In a smaller group, a dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS) is found, showing hyperferritinemia in combination with mild iron accumulation in the reticuloendothelial cells. The smallest group consists of NAFLD patients with hemochromatosis. Phlebotomy is only effective with hepatocellular iron overload and should not be the treatment when hyperferritinemia is related to inflammation, whether or not combined with DIOS. Treatment with lifestyle changes is to date probably the more effective way until new medication is becoming available.

* These authors contributed equally to this work.


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