Thromb Haemost 1991; 66(04): 500-504
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1646446
Review Article
Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart

Detection of the Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Mutations in Arab and Iraqi-Jewish Patients by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Analysis of Blood or Urine Samples

H Peretz
The Chemistry Laboratory and Institute of Hematology, Sourasky-Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Division of Hematology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
,
U Seligsohn
The Chemistry Laboratory and Institute of Hematology, Sourasky-Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Division of Hematology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
,
E Zwang
The Chemistry Laboratory and Institute of Hematology, Sourasky-Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Division of Hematology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
,
B S Coller
The Chemistry Laboratory and Institute of Hematology, Sourasky-Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Division of Hematology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
,
P J Newman
The Chemistry Laboratory and Institute of Hematology, Sourasky-Tel Aviv Medical Center and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Division of Hematology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Blood Center of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received 15 February 1991

Accepted 24 April 1991

Publication Date:
25 July 2018 (online)

Summary

Severe Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is relatively frequent in Iraqi-Jews and Arabs residing in Israel. We have recently described the mutations responsible for the disease in Iraqi-Jews – an 11 base pair deletion in exon 12 of the glycoprotein IIIa gene, and in Arabs – a 13 base pair deletion at the AG acceptor splice site of exon 4 on the glycoprotein IIb gene. In this communication we show that the Iraqi-Jewish mutation can be identified directly by polymerase chain reaction and gel electrophoresis. With specially designed oligonucleotide primers encompassing the mutation site, an 80 base pair segment amplified in healthy controls was clearly distinguished from the 69 base pair segment produced in patients. Patients from 11 unrelated Iraqi-Jewish families had the same mutation. The Arab mutation was identified by first amplifying a DNA segment consisting of 312 base pairs in controls and of 299 base pairs in patients, and then digestion by a restriction enzyme Stu-1, which recognizes a site that is absent in the mutant gene. In controls the 312 bp segment was digested into 235 and 77 bp fragments, while in patients there was no change in the size of the amplified 299 bp segment. The mutation was found in patients from 3 out of 5 unrelated Arab families. Both Iraqi-Jewish and Arab mutations were detectable in DNA extracted from blood and urine samples. The described simple methods of identifying the mutations should be useful for detection of the numerous potential carriers among the affected kindreds and for prenatal diagnosis using DNA extracted from chorionic villi samples.